Most of the taproom was made from up-cycled pallets and other wood products. It’s more the experience of the tour and the tasting of our beers that make Tool Shed Unique. Tool Shed Brewing Company co-founders Jeff and Graham started the Calgary brewery in Graham’s backyard tool shed. When they started in 2012, minimum brewing capacity in Alberta was 500,000 litres and there were only two Calgary breweries. Tool Shed Brewing was initially forced to brew beer out of province and import back into Alberta. Knowing some of the best malt barley in the world is grown here in our province, this demanded a change from the government in brewing minimums. Jeff and Graham were at the forefront of successfully lobbying for that change in Alberta. In 2013 the Alberta Liquor and Gaming Commission opened the doors for microbreweries and changed the provinces economic landscape forever.

Tool Shed Brewing continues to push for change in our local economy, from advocating the Calgary Stampede to serve local craft beer, to increase awareness with the City to improve administrative efficiencies that help other Calgary businesses.

Today Tool Shed Brewing has four core beers and several seasonals in rotation. Each award-winning beer has its own story and honors someone who has played an integral role in growing not only Tool Shed Brewing but the craft beer industry as a whole.

 3 tours up to 50 people, we require pre-registration. No kids on tour. 

The parish replaced the frame church with a more elaborate structure in 1905, during Calgary’s famous sandstone era. It is of local, rough cut Paskapoo sandstone, and has one of the oldest tin roofs in Calgary. It was designed by J.C.M. Keith of Victoria, BC. The Cathedral celebrated the 100th anniversary of the first service held in the building on July 30, 2005. It was designated a Registered Heritage Site in 1974.  In 1936, the Lady Chapel, the gift of Henry and Eleanor Tomkins was constructed. In its tower hangs a bell, which had originally hung in the tower of the first wooden church on the site. The bell was donated as a remembrance to Corporal Lowry of the North West Mounted Police who died during the Riel Rebellion of 1885. The rood screen was dedicated in 1919 by Prince of Wales. Some historic stained glass windows dating back to 1891. Historic war memorials can be found in the Cathedral. Hand-carved Oak Pulpit and bronze lectern are original to the 1905 construction.  The Cathedral is an important music venue with one of Calgary’s fine organs and home to Pro-Arts which features a free noon-hour concert each Wednesday.

Please note there is a regular Sunday Service at 10:30 AM, otherwise, activities start at noon on September 23.

The Presbyterian congregation that gave birth to the present-day Knox United Church originally met at the I.G. Baker store in Inglewood, where Rev. Angus Robertson preached to a small crowd of 30 or so parishioners. The current neo-Gothic Paskapoo sandstone church building was completed in 1913 and its impressive arches and exterior buttresses continue to make Knox an inspiring architectural jewel in downtown Calgary.

In 1925, the Knox congregation, along with Presbyterian, Methodist, and Congregationalist churches across Canada, voted to join the United Church of Canada.

As a United Church congregation, Knox values inclusion, community engagement, and progressive theology. Making connections for the common good.

Sanctuary, Labyrinth, Healing Ministry, Concerts, Theatre, the original home of Inn from the Cold

Making connections for the common good.

Tours, cafe beverages, more activities and/or music.

Walk the labyrinth for meditation, chat and enjoy a beverage in the Sanctuary.

The Calgary Horticultural Society is a registered charity dedicated to cultivating Calgary’s gardening community. With 4,000 plus members, we are one of the largest and most active gardening organizations. In 2018, the Society celebrates its 110th anniversary. The Society’s mandate has a strong focus on gardening education and offers the knowledge and skills to do it well. The Society is driven by the belief that as the gardening community grows, the city’s quality of life is enhanced, and so is the environment.

From our office just off Macleod Trail, our devoted staff works year-round to develop and deliver quality educational programs that help local gardeners meet the challenges of Calgary’s unique microclimate.

Discover what’s happening at the Society.

Join us for activities in the Society Office and Garden—our traditional yard has been transformed from lawn into an outdoor classroom with raised vegetable beds, three large-sized demonstration compost bins, fruiting trees and shrubs, herbs and flowers. Come to learn about the rain garden, growing vegetables, simple garden irrigation, perennial plants of the year and composting. Chat with a gardener or settle in for storytime. Calgary Horticultural Society volunteers will be on hand to answer your gardening questions, show off the teaching gardens and offer membership sales. Our garden gate is open—we look forward to your visit.

Protospace exists to incubate projects and initiatives by providing a physical space and tools, as well as an online community for idea generation & project planning. We make space for you to make things.
We also have a holodeck!

– Laser Cutting demonstrations – Community Run Makerspace – 3D Printing presentation

We offer guided tours of 10 people per tour, tours run every half hour (:00 and: 30)

Built in 1987 by Graham McCourt Architects, the Olympic Oval Long Track Skating facility was constructed for the 1988 Calgary Olympic Winter Games.  It is one of the legacy facilities from the 1988 Olympic Winter Games and a possible location for the 2026 Calgary Olympic Winer Games.

The Olympic Oval is able to provide a self-guided tour of the building. The 3rd Floor Observation deck provides a stunning 180-degree view of all 150,000 square feet. It’s a spectacular view.

Explore your inner-geek and play with the latest in robotics, coding, maker activities, tinker time, and new technologies like 3D printing and wearable tech.

One guided tour per hour to tinker, code and have fun with tech!

Code your own Minecraft character; Build your own animal with Lego robotics; Make your clothes sparkle with wearable tech

Wonder what a Buddhist temple would be like? We have all types of people. The tradition is Japanese, Jodo Shinshu. We have dharma school for the kids, meditation services, and Sunday services we sit in chairs and listen to a dharma talk.

Come for service at 10 am or drop in between 11:30 and 4 pm on Sunday we will do a little mini instruction tour in groups as people arrive including the history of the building and what services are like.

In 1981 the building was purchased from the Croatian Church, the steeple was removed, and it became the home for the Calgary Buddhist Temple; renovated to its current modern look in 2015. Before that, the building itself was home to a number of Catholic Churches before being bought by the Buddhist community. Built in 1912, it was originally in Tuxedo Park at 23 Ave and 1 St, which was the outskirts of town, with the expectation that city would grow to it. But a year later the economy crashed and it was left way out of town.

The first group to worship in the church was St. Stephens Ukrainian congregation. St. Josephs Roman Catholic congregation used the space as well until their structure was built a couple years later. During the first world war, the church was shut down for a period due to the discriminatory attitudes that existed against the Ukrainian population.


In 1926, with immigration having resumed and many of the Ukrainian population concentrating in the Bridgeland/Riverside area, the church was moved. In 1958 the congregation built their current location up on the hill in Bridgeland and sold this building to another Roman Catholic congregation, Our Lady Queen of Poland. When that group became too big for the building they sold it to a Croatian Church who worshiped there until 1981 when the Buddhist community bought it. Most of this information came from this audio recording – CBC.

http://www.cbc.ca/eyeopener/episode/2011/08/11/hidden-calgary—a-century-old-church-in-bridgeland/

Fourth-generation Syrian refugees bring the centuries-old art of soap making to Calgary

Abdulfatah Sabouni is a fourth generation soap maker. Making soap has been his family business for more than 125 years. Even his last name, Sabouni, means soap maker.

In 2015, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s military issued warnings to the residents of Aleppo to vacate the city. Fearing for his family’s safety and weary of the sounds of bombs and gunfire, Sabouni and his loved ones left their home city and joined the more than seven million Syrians desperately trying to escape the madness. They first made their way to Jordan, and two years later they landed safely on Canadian soil, thanks to help from the federal government. Now the gregarious father is proudly showing off the showroom and factory for Aleppo Savon, his new business here in Canada.

The centuries-old tradition of Aleppo soap making — which uses no chemicals or other additives —involves secret family recipes handed down for generations. In the 11th century, the Crusaders brought Aleppo soap back to Europe, starting a centuries-long love affair with the coconut and olive-oil based soap said to be intensely moisturizing. Aleppo soap is thought to be one of the world’s oldest types of soap and also said to have been the inspiration for the equally famous Marseille soap of France.

As the Syrian war heated up, many life-long soap makers fled with their families. Traditional soap factories in Aleppo were either destroyed or abandoned, creating a worldwide shortage of Aleppo soap. Newspaper headlines appeared in Europe, Saudi Arabia, and Japan, where the soap is highly coveted.

When Sabouni arrived in Calgary two years ago, his entrepreneurial dreams were never far from his thoughts. He threw himself into learning English and co-founded with two friends: another Syrian refugee, Walid Balsha, and Syrian-Canadian entrepreneur Husny Hadry. Together the three got the ball rolling, and opened Aleppo Savon to great success. Their business continues to grow, and they have big plans for distribution across Canada and North America.

For Sabouni, making the world-famous Aleppo soap is his way of giving back to a city and country that has given him and his family so much.

Built in 1891 by Architect R.H. Bowes of Ottawa, Ontario The Lougheed House is Calgary’s only remaining sandstone mansion, built for James and Isabella Lougheed. Built in the Victorian Eclectic style, this 14,000 square foot house is now a Historic House Museum and arts and cultural space.

Behind the scenes tour into our collections and archives, as well as access to the top floor of the house.

1 tour per hour, starting at 11:00 am with the last tour at 3:00 pm. 15 people per tour. Sign up at the door. First come first served.

We’re not a Gelato company. We’re far more than that. We started by making delicious, tiny spoonfuls of heaven – and we still do. But our mission and vision is to have a measurable impact on how the world looks at employment, business, and what we deserve as consumers.

Tours and tastings! You will get a glimpse of the Fiasco culture, a look at our everyday work life, knowledge of Fiasco history, and a chance to meet some of the special people behind Fiasco. 

 

We have lots happening at our booth so you can see what goes on behind the scenes at The City of Calgary.

911 services will demonstrate what happens when we receive an emergency call, a certified professional dog trainer will give tips and tricks to pet owners, a livery officer will share information about how to stay safe when using taxis and ride-sharing vehicles and a bylaw officer will bring a vehicle and educate participants on the various bylaws in Calgary, including Parks and responsible pet ownership.

Stop by and talk to us, we’d love to see you!

Cococo Chocolatiers, owners of Chocolaterie Bernard Callebaut manufacture delicious, best quality couverture, sustainable chocolate treats for their 11 Calgary stores (27 shops across North America). In 2013, the original factory location at 1st street was destroyed in the devastating Calgary floods. It took several years to re-build the Cococo chocolate confections factory which opened in 2015. From this factory, traditional Belgium chocolate favourites and Cococo’s food-forward approach to new chocolate products meet.

Learn more about Calgary’s Cococo Chocolatiers and their commitment to supporting a sustainable chocolate future and quality ingredients. Tour Cococo’s new chocolate factory and learn about how quality confections are made!

Maximum 20-25 people per tour. Tours are full.

YouthLink is home to the Calgary Police Museum, a site filled with Calgary Police stories, exhibits, and artifacts dating back to the late 1880s.

We believe that if youth are educated with the facts and armed with the relevant information, they have a better chance of making good decisions in the face of peer pressure and other factors. We also know that one bad decision can lead them down a path to either being a victim of crime or a perpetrator of crime. Our goal is that the information they learn while visiting and learning in our immersive exhibits will keep them safe for life.

We will be featuring ‘behind the scenes’ talks and activities relating to the police museum and the Calgary Police Service. A display of never-seen-before artifacts, ‘Tales from the Crypt’ – creepy stories from our archives.

All areas of the museum will showcase a variety of units of the Calgary Police Service – there will be uniformed officers on-site giving presentations and facilitating unique activities and games.

The total building capacity is 300. Each classroom can hold about 60 people.

KidSIM is a world-class program known for delivering education to healthcare teams, family members and students in a simulation environment.  It is the largest pediatric simulation training centre in Canada.

Doors Open YYC gives visitors a rare opportunity to get an exclusive look at the KidSIM Simulation Centre at the Alberta Children’s Hospital! Centre staff will be on hand offering behind-the-scenes tours and broadcasting simulations showcasing the use of high-fidelity mannequins and state-of-the-art technology.

Visitors will also have the opportunity to have hands-on experience with the mannequins and observe some of the equipment that is similarly used in clinical settings throughout the Alberta Children’s Hospital. With beautiful architectural details and state-of-the-art technology, this amazing centre solidifies the KidSIM Program as one of the premiere simulation facilities in the world!

 

Located on the campus of Mount Royal University, the versatile Taylor Centre for the Performing Arts is a world-class facility dedicated to meeting the needs of the community. From international icons to up-and-coming talent, the TCPA truly showcases the best the arts has to offer.

Visit us to enjoy this acoustic, architectural, and sustainable masterpiece!

The Bella Concert Hall is the heart of the facility, providing state-of-the-art acoustics in an architecturally stunning environment. And we are proud to be the home of Mount Royal Conservatory, which has played a pivotal role in Calgary performing arts scene since 1911. The Conservatory inspires more than 10,000 registrants annually through a variety of programming, concerts, and events.

The Taylor Centre for the Performing arts boasts Canada’s largest musical teaching institution and Calgary’s first new major performance hall in three decades. It is now the home of Mount Royal’s Conservatory, which began back in 1911, and will be able to provide more than 6,000 students each year with unparalleled musical instruction. It houses the Bella Concert Hall, a state-of-the-art medium-sized performance hall that will draw artists from around the world for the enjoyment of audiences.

Giving a nod to MRU’s heritage, the Taylor Centre has been designed to resemble a barn — the school’s original building was nicknamed “The Barn” by staff and students. Aged metal, grey silt, and copper mark the centre’s exterior, while skylights and glass walls flood the interior with natural light. Adding to the warm, inviting atmosphere are the cherry-wood walls throughout the inside of the building. The breathtaking building is designed to LEED Gold specifications.

The TCPA is the recipient of the City of Calgary’s Award for Accessibility. The 95,000-square-foot building features accessible seating in all our performance spaces. Assistive listening devices are available for the Bella Concert Hall and TransAlta Pavilion.

In addition to its memorable public areas, the multifunctional TCPA features instructional spaces for private lessons, rehearsal halls for ensembles of all sizes and a dedicated wing for the Conservatory’s Early Childhood music programs.

There will be tours at 11 am12 pm1 pm, and 2 pm. Drop in only.

Fast facts: http://www.mtroyal.ca/AboutMountRoyal/MediaRoom/Newsroom/taylorcentrefactsheet.htm

Beautiful Islamic Architecture of Baitunnur Mosque, One of the largest Mosques in North America. Inaugurated by Worldwide Supreme Head of Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama’at and joined by Prime Minister of Canada.

Guided Mosque Tours, Free refreshments, Q & A opportunities for the visitors etc.

Protospace exists to incubate projects and initiatives by providing a physical space and tools, as well as an online community for idea generation & project planning. We make space for you to make things.
We also have a holodeck!

– Laser Cutting demonstrations – Community Run Makerspace – 3D Printing presentation

We offer guided tours of 10 people per tour, tours run every half hour (:00 and: 30)

Tucked away in Calgary’s Beltline neighborhood is the historic Haultain School.  Built in 1894 by Child and Wilson when Alberta was not yet a province, it was home to Calgary’s first sandstone two-room schoolhouse. Its first students included children of railway workers, new immigrants and some of Calgary’s wealthier citizens.

Learn about the unique architecture and history of this historic gem, Calgary’s oldest surviving and very first sandstone school with running water.

Hear about how the school changed over the years and about its current tenants, two non-profit organizations, Parks Foundation Calgary and Calgary Heritage Authority.

Refreshments and snacks will be served.

What can you do to use your head, heart, and hands to make a difference? Brown Bagging for Calgary’s Kids connects and inspires people to take meaningful action to feed and care for kids. BB4CK works in partnership with Calgary schools to make and deliver healthy lunches to students who would otherwise go without.

Each school day, Brown Bagging for Calgary’s Kids impacts 4,200 Calgary kids who would otherwise go without a lunch.

BB4CK invites you to join us in our kitchen to discover how Calgarians provide healthy lunches to children in need. Drop by anytime during the day to explore the kitchen, learn about BB4CK programs, decorate lunch bags and enjoy a light snack.

From 10:30am-12:30pm and 1:30-3:30pm participate in food preparation (register in advance – space limited http://signup.com/go/XeceVYC ) and create nutritious snacks for children’s lunches. We look forward to your visit!

Avatamsaka Monastery is one of 27 branch monasteries of the Dharma Realm Buddhist
Association, established by Venerable Master Hsuan Hua. “Avatamsaka” is a Sanskrit word
meaning ‘flower garland’ and monastery in Sanskrit is “Bodhimanda,” a place for awakening.
Avatamsaka is also the name of one of the most significant Buddhist sutras.

This is our sacred space and we hope that all who enter will find the sacred within them. We
encourage people to open and expand their wisdom and compassion. Everyone, who has
an interest in self-exploration is welcome in our monastery.

We have an eclectic congregation of people from different backgrounds and countries and
accommodate the variety of languages they speak. The monastery offers numerous
activities during the year, including interfaith dialogues, veggie buffets, a banquet in
appreciation of seniors, and pilgrimages to Castle Mountain.

As you tour the Temple, you will see Dharma Masters, identifiable by their robes and
volunteers, identifiable by their vests. Please ask them any questions you have regarding
the various exhibits and traditional Buddhist art displayed throughout the monastery.

This building, originally called the Bow Building was designed by Dr. Cam Sproule and
completed in 1959. The rough-cut stones are native to Alberta. Since moving into this
building in 1996 we have undertaken two major renovations in 2005 and 2017 adding four
stories to the original building. The exterior is finished with the same rough-cut stones while
the interior now includes a meditation hall, a prayer hall, a dining area and ancillary rooms
for meetings and activities.

The prayer hall, completed in 2017, is called the Great Jewelled Hall. It is 62 feet in height
and houses the three bronze statues; the central statue of Vairochana Buddha including his
halo is 18 feet tall. The walls of the hall are lined with 10,000 statues which are all
handcrafted and made by volunteers in the basement of the monastery. You can view the
entire statue-making process in the video corner. At the west side of the Great Jewelled Hall
is a rare set of books of the Buddhist Canon.

In his address at the inauguration of the Great Jewelled Hall, Mayor Nenshi said, “This place
should be a centre of faith, a centre of community for many, many generations. . . . bringing
faith into the heart of our city . . . [and it] reminds us that our roles are to build a better
community for everyone.” We strive every day to build a better community and a better
world for all.

We pray that the Buddha’s light will shine throughout the city, the province, the country and
the entire world, bringing peace and compassion to all.

Pre-registration for guided tours, maximum 50 people. (11am and 2pm)

Built in 1987 by Graham McCourt Architects, the Olympic Oval Long Track Skating facility was constructed for the 1988 Calgary Olympic Winter Games.  It is one of the legacy facilities from the 1988 Olympic Winter Games and a possible location for the 2026 Calgary Olympic Winer Games.

The Olympic Oval is able to provide a self-guided tour of the building. The 3rd Floor Observation deck provides a stunning 180-degree view of all 150,000 square feet. It’s a spectacular view.

The parish replaced the frame church with a more elaborate structure in 1905, during Calgary’s famous sandstone era. It is of local, rough cut Paskapoo sandstone, and has one of the oldest tin roofs in Calgary. It was designed by J.C.M. Keith of Victoria, BC. The Cathedral celebrated the 100th anniversary of the first service held in the building on July 30, 2005. It was designated a Registered Heritage Site in 1974.  In 1936, the Lady Chapel, the gift of Henry and Eleanor Tomkins was constructed. In its tower hangs a bell, which had originally hung in the tower of the first wooden church on the site. The bell was donated as a remembrance to Corporal Lowry of the North West Mounted Police who died during the Riel Rebellion of 1885. The rood screen was dedicated in 1919 by Prince of Wales. Some historic stained glass windows dating back to 1891. Historic war memorials can be found in the Cathedral. Hand-carved Oak Pulpit and bronze lectern are original to the 1905 construction.  The Cathedral is an important music venue with one of Calgary’s fine organs and home to Pro-Arts which features a free noon-hour concert each Wednesday.

Opened in 2017 in the Riddell Library and Learning Centre, the Mount Royal University Library boasts stunning LEED Gold certified architecture as well as innovative teaching, learning, and creative spaces. The doors will be open for you to visit the Maker Studio, explore VR/AR/MR in the Experience Lab, and get inspired in the Visualization spaces. Don’t leave without taking a self-guided tour through the building, including current exhibits, displays, and a visit to Barrow—a student-owned and operated café on the first floor.  

Calgary community members can also learn how to access our collections and spaces, as well as attend Library-hosted events throughout the year from Service Desk staff who will be available to answer questions.

There are restrictions on the number of people who can be in some of the specialized spaces at a time (20-25 for Maker Studio, 6-10 for the Experience Lab (Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, and Mixed Reality), 60 for Ideas (Visualization Lounge).

The cornerstone for the present location of the church was laid in September 1955, by Most Rev. Neil Savaryn OSBM, Bishop of the Ukrainian Catholic Eparchy of Edmonton. By December of that year, Divine Liturgies were being held in the completed basement of the church which then doubled as a church sanctuary and hall until the main storey could be completed. From its origins at the start of the 20th century, the parish was under the patronage of St. Stephen the Protomartyr. During the relocation to the present location the name of the parish changed. Because of the devotion that an Auschwitz survivor, the then-current pastor Fr. George Kowalsky had to the Virgin Mary, and in fulfillment of a vow he had made to Her and in gratitude, for being freed from the Nazi concentration camp he convinced the parishioners to place the church under the protection of the Mother of God. The name change was formalized in 1957.

 

CJSW 90.9FM is Calgary’s campus and community radio station, located at the University of Calgary. CJSW is a non-profit society maintained and operated by a group of seven staff members and over 300 volunteers drawn from both the University of Calgary student body and the wider city of Calgary population. CJSW broadcasts music, spoken word and multicultural programming on 90.9FM and streaming right here at cjsw.com!

Come to visit us for a tour of the station, and spin some tracks on our DJ mixers & turntables, and experiment with different vocal effects in our recording booths!

Radio Station Tours! DJ Workshops! Voice Recording Workshops! 15 people per tour, 1 tour per hour

Fourth-generation Syrian refugees bring the centuries-old art of soap making to Calgary

Abdulfatah Sabouni is a fourth generation soap maker. Making soap has been his family business for more than 125 years. Even his last name, Sabouni, means soap maker.

In 2015, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s military issued warnings to the residents of Aleppo to vacate the city. Fearing for his family’s safety and weary of the sounds of bombs and gunfire, Sabouni and his loved ones left their home city and joined the more than seven million Syrians desperately trying to escape the madness. They first made their way to Jordan, and two years later they landed safely on Canadian soil, thanks to help from the federal government. Now the gregarious father is proudly showing off the showroom and factory for Aleppo Savon, his new business here in Canada.

The centuries-old tradition of Aleppo soap making — which uses no chemicals or other additives —involves secret family recipes handed down for generations. In the 11th century, the Crusaders brought Aleppo soap back to Europe, starting a centuries-long love affair with the coconut and olive-oil based soap said to be intensely moisturizing. Aleppo soap is thought to be one of the world’s oldest types of soap and also said to have been the inspiration for the equally famous Marseille soap of France.

As the Syrian war heated up, many life-long soap makers fled with their families. Traditional soap factories in Aleppo were either destroyed or abandoned, creating a worldwide shortage of Aleppo soap. Newspaper headlines appeared in Europe, Saudi Arabia, and Japan, where the soap is highly coveted.

When Sabouni arrived in Calgary two years ago, his entrepreneurial dreams were never far from his thoughts. He threw himself into learning English and co-founded with two friends: another Syrian refugee, Walid Balsha, and Syrian-Canadian entrepreneur Husny Hadry. Together the three got the ball rolling, and opened Aleppo Savon to great success. Their business continues to grow, and they have big plans for distribution across Canada and North America.

For Sabouni, making the world-famous Aleppo soap is his way of giving back to a city and country that has given him and his family so much.

For over 35 years F&D Scene Changes Ltd. has been internationally celebrated for our talent in transforming our clients’ ideas into reality. Our projects range from fabricating scenery for theatre, television, and film to museum exhibits, commercial and retail, theme park elements, trade show and retail displays. We have fabricated and installed our products throughout North America and internationally for various clients such as Universal Studios California, Disney (Orlando, California, Tokyo, Hong Kong and Shanghai), The Centre Theatre Group in Los Angeles, CrossIron Mills Mall in Balzac, AB The Glenbow Museum, The Calgary Zoo and many venues throughout Canada and the United States.

F&D is located in the Dominion Bridge Building, a 60,000 square foot facility on the edge of downtown Calgary, Alberta. In 1923 the building was used for Iron Work and later an additional steel shop, plate shop and ‘Blue Whale’ building was added. Today, this building is only one of two surviving metal factories from before WWI in the city. This original steel foundry includes a high central bay, overhead rail for cranes, and shed style wings.  The shop is home to multiple disciplines running the gamut of metal fabrication, carpentry, fiberglass, an enormous scenic drop shop, a sewing and soft goods area, an industrial and scenic paint booth and our design/drafting department.

REGISTRATION REQUIRED

During the DOYYC, we will offer guided tours of our day-to-day operations and facilities located in the historic Dominion Bridge Building. Our guided tours are approximately 30-40 minutes in length. First tour is at 10 am and they will run every half hour with the last tour at 4 pm. Registration is required as space is limited.
Please register using the below link

IMPORTANT: Not very wheelchair or stroller friendly. Not permitted to take photo or video during the tours. Please note that we are a working shop and we ask that everyone attending wear appropriate footwear (no open-toed or high heeled shoes please). Normal shop hazards exist, such as the possibility of dust/fumes, tripping hazards, uneven floors, etc.

 

Global Calgary (also known as CICT) signed on October 8th, 1954 as CHCT, the first television station in Alberta. The studios, offices, and antenna were located seven miles west of the city of Calgary.

Almost twenty years later, CHCT was purchased by Selkirk Broadcasting, and the station’s call sign was changed to CFAC-TV. In 1979, the station branded itself as Channel 2&7, referring to its cable location.

In 1989, CFAC-TV was once again sold, this time to Western International Communications (WIC). In March 1990, the call letters were changed to CKKX-TV. Two years later, the station’s news operations expanded with the purchase of a satellite uplink truck and a fleet of electronic news gathering microwave trucks.

On September 7th, 1993, CKKX was renamed CICT-TV, the call letters used today. It also took on the brand of Calgary 7.

The station was sold to Canwest in 1998 but required approval from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC). Approval was given in 2000. On September 4th of that year, CICT-TV joined the Global Television Network, along with fellow Alberta stations, CITV-TV (Edmonton), and CISA (Lethbridge). By 2001, Global Calgary also began airing in Drumheller and Banff.

On April 11th, 2007, CICT became the first station in Calgary with a news helicopter. Named Global 1, it provides traffic reports during Global News Morning and Global News at 5 & 6, as well as breaking news coverage you can’t find anywhere else.

Now, Global Calgary is part of the expansive team with Corus Entertainment, that offers Canadians from coast to coast a host of news and information – from breaking news in their community to deep engaging content that puts complex world issues in perspective. Our local newsrooms provide up-to-the-minute community-based news, weather, and information, while our national coverage features stories, analysis and deep, engaging content about issues in Canada and abroad.

Visitors will receive a guided tour of Calgary’s #1 News Station, meet & greets with Global News anchors and reporters and see the magic behind television news.

Tours are now full.

The water tower built in 1920 is believed to be the only structure of its kind in Canada. St. Mary’s Historic Walking Tour will allow guests to follow the enticing stories behind the land that St. Mary’s now sits on, including the story of the Lacombe Home which burnt down in 1999.

Join our tour guides as we explore St. Mary’s University’s past, present, and future. Each tour will take approximately 2 hours. The walking tour will delve into the stories of the land St. Mary’s now sits on and its history. Tours will include a look inside St. Mary’s historic water tower that has been transformed into the beautiful Mauro Art Gallery, as well as a look at the Saint John’s Bible, which is the first handwritten and illuminated Bible in more than 500 years.

There will be one tour per hour on the hour. Tour capacity is 15 people. Pre-registration is encouraged. Each tour is approximately 2 hours long.

St. Mary’s University Campus – Doors Open YYC

We’re not a Gelato company. We’re far more than that. We started by making delicious, tiny spoonfuls of heaven – and we still do. But our mission and vision is to have a measurable impact on how the world looks at employment, business, and what we deserve as consumers.

Tours and tastings! You will get a glimpse of the Fiasco culture, a look at our everyday work life, knowledge of Fiasco history, and a chance to meet some of the special people behind Fiasco. 

 

The Calgary Fire Department was first formed in 1885 and is celebrating its 133 anniversary on August 25. The fire bylaw was the impetus for Calgary’s sandstone renaissance in the late 19th century. After the Calgary Fire of 1886, the bylaw demanded all new buildings be fire resistant, hence buildings of brick and sandstone from the era of 1886 to 1915.

The Department responds to over 60,000 calls annually and is the third largest in Canada. Chief Cappy Smart was a cultural and social leader who marshaled the first Stampede Parade and every parade for the first three decades of its existence.

The Department has grown in lockstep with the City and our stations in the respective communities were usually one of the first items of infrastructure in the neighborhoods.

Built in 1978, Silversprings is one of three Calgary fire stations where the aquatic team is based. These firefighters, in addition to regular duties, use boats, dive and surface equipment and techniques for rescue. The jet boat patrols the rivers of Calgary June through September when up to 6,000 people a day take to our rivers for recreation.

We will have juice packs and coffee available for visitors. We will also have cookies or snack bars (all ingredients will be listed and we will ensure there are no peanuts of common allergens).


We will have tours of fire apparatus and the station going on continuously. We also intend to set up apparatus such as aerials and pumps to demonstrate their operation if possible. A hose for kids to knock down pylons will be set up in the parking lot weather permitting.

Most of the taproom was made from up-cycled pallets and other wood products. It’s more the experience of the tour and the tasting of our beers that make Tool Shed Unique. Tool Shed Brewing Company co-founders Jeff and Graham started the Calgary brewery in Graham’s backyard tool shed. When they started in 2012, minimum brewing capacity in Alberta was 500,000 litres and there were only two Calgary breweries. Tool Shed Brewing was initially forced to brew beer out of province and import back into Alberta. Knowing some of the best malt barley in the world is grown here in our province, this demanded a change from the government in brewing minimums. Jeff and Graham were at the forefront of successfully lobbying for that change in Alberta. In 2013 the Alberta Liquor and Gaming Commission opened the doors for microbreweries and changed the provinces economic landscape forever.

Tool Shed Brewing continues to push for change in our local economy, from advocating the Calgary Stampede to serve local craft beer, to increase awareness with the City to improve administrative efficiencies that help other Calgary businesses.

Today Tool Shed Brewing has four core beers and several seasonals in rotation. Each award-winning beer has its own story and honors someone who has played an integral role in growing not only Tool Shed Brewing but the craft beer industry as a whole.

We will provide a numerous tour throughout the day.

We could provide a tour and tasting every 2 hours.

 3 tours up to 50 people, we’d require pre-registration. No kids on tour. 

Cococo Chocolatiers, owners of Chocolaterie Bernard Callebaut manufacture delicious, best quality couverture, sustainable chocolate treats for their 11 Calgary stores (27 shops across North America). In 2013, the original factory location at 1st street was destroyed in the devastating Calgary floods. It took several years to re-build the Cococo chocolate confections factory which opened in 2015. From this factory, traditional Belgium chocolate favourites and Cococo’s food-forward approach to new chocolate products meet.

Learn more about Calgary’s Cococo Chocolatiers and their commitment to supporting a sustainable chocolate future and quality ingredients. Tour Cococo’s new chocolate factory and learn about how quality confections are made!

Maximum 20-25 people per tour. Tours are full.

The Calgary Fire Department was first formed in 1885 and is celebrating its 133 anniversary on August 25. The fire bylaw was the impetus for Calgary’s sandstone renaissance in the late 19th century. After the Calgary Fire of 1886, the bylaw demanded all new buildings be fire resistant, hence buildings of brick and sandstone from the era of 1886 to 1915.

The Department responds to over 60,000 calls annually and is the third largest in Canada. Chief Cappy Smart was a cultural and social leader who marshaled the first Stampede Parade and every parade for the first three decades of its existence.

The Department has grown in lockstep with the City and our stations in the respective communities were usually one of the first items of infrastructure in the neighborhoods.

Cedarbrae Fire Station has a household hazardous waste drop off—one of the most popular in Calgary.

We will have juice packs and coffee available for visitors. We will also have cookies or snack bars (all ingredients will be listed and we will ensure there are no peanuts of common allergens).


We will have tours of fire apparatus and the station going on continuously. We also intend to set up apparatus such as aerials and pumps to demonstrate their operation if possible. A hose for kids to knock down pylons will be set up in the parking lot weather permitting.

Inglewood Bird Sanctuary

The Inglewood Bird Sanctuary and Nature Centre have been providing migratory birds with a place to rest their wings since 1929

Colonel Walker’s son, Selby, applied to the Federal government in 1929 to have 59 acres on the west side of the Bow River be designated as a Federal Migratory Bird Sanctuary. When Selby died in 1953, Ed Jefferies acquired the property and leased it to the Alberta Fish & Game Association. In 1970, The City of Calgary purchased the property and has been managing it as a natural reserve ever since

Colonel Walker House

Colonel Walker House is the third rendition of the house, built in 1910, as the first two were washed away by floods. It has the original fir doors, door casings, brass key plates and hexagonal door knobs. An Italian influence is apparent in the design of the veranda, corner tower and in the various decorations as well as the notable use of local brick and sandstone elements.

One of the first houses in Calgary to have verandas. The name on the house was used to name the community surrounding it (Inglewood). Owned by Colonel James Walker, who was named Citizen of the Century in 1975, was the first president of the Calgary Exhibition and Stampede Board, and was chairman of the first civic committee.

We will be offering guided walks through the sanctuary every half an hour between 10 am – 4 pm (12 tours in total)


We will have an Environmental Educator in the historic Colonel Walker to answer any questions people might have about the place. This is the only event that we allow the public in the upstairs portion of this historic house!

Each tour will have a maximum of 25 participants
The tours will take place every half an hour throughout the duration of the event (10am – 4pm)
The terrain is a mixture of paved and unpaved pathway

Situated on the corner of 9th Ave and 4th St SE in the East Village, the sleek ENMAX District Energy Centre is a facility you’ve likely walked, cycled, or driven by many times and may have mistaken as an office building. Take a closer look through its street-level windows, and instead of desks and cubicles, you’ll see a network of pipes. This infrastructure is the heart of a thermal network that consists of over 5,500 metres of underground insulated pipes that bring centralized heating to commercial, institutional and residential buildings across downtown. Opened in 2010, the 20,000 sq. ft. facility houses 55 MW of high-efficiency natural gas boilers that can heat over 10 million sq. ft. of space in the downtown core and East Village. In other words, enough office space for nearly 100,000 people.

The underground network of pipes carries thermal energy, in the form of hot water, to be used for space heating and domestic hot water to customers including City Hall, Studio Bell, Simmons Building, Hilton Hotel, Telus SKY, and Intact Place. Although District Energy as a concept isn’t new, what sets this system apart is the additional ways it delivers efficiency. In early 2018, ENMAX added a 3.3 MW combined heat and power (CHP) unit to the District Energy Centre which enables on-site electricity generation and increases the plant’s reliability, resiliency, and efficiency. The building also has rooftop solar and battery storage used to generate and discharge electricity in unique ways. Come to visit us on September 22 as part of Doors Open YYC 2018 to learn more.

District Energy allows for an entire district or community to be heated from one central location, resulting in greater efficiency and fewer emissions than conventional heating systems.

As technology advances, new fuel sources will continue to be integrated into the District Energy Centre, benefitting all buildings connected to the system at the same time.

The ENMAX District Energy Centre will be open for guided tours as part of Doors Open YYC on September 22 from 10:00 am – 3:00 pm.
The ENMAX District Energy Centre is an operating industrial facility. A waiver of liability is required to participate in the facility tour.
• Guided tours are on a first-come-first-serve basis.
• Tours duration is 15-20 minutes in length.
• Tour sizes are restricted to 15 people at a time.
• All tour guests must wear flat close-toed shoes. No exceptions.
• Hard hats and safety glasses will be provided to all tour guests.

The Calgary Fire Department was first formed in 1885 and is celebrating its 133 anniversary on August 25. The fire bylaw was the impetus for Calgary’s sandstone renaissance in the late 19th century. After the Calgary Fire of 1886, the bylaw demanded all new buildings be fire resistant, hence buildings of brick and sandstone from the era of 1886 to 1915.

The Department responds to over 60,000 calls annually and is the third largest in Canada. Chief Cappy Smart was a cultural and social leader who marshaled the first Stampede Parade and every parade for the first three decades of its existence.

The Department has grown in lockstep with the City and our stations in the respective communities were usually one of the first items of infrastructure in the neighborhoods.

McKenzie Towne Station was paid for and built by Carma. They also gifted the CFD a vintage fire truck (that now resides in our museum after a long stay at the fire station). The Station is at the edge of the traffic circle and we have shared our space with CPS and EMS in the past. It is the most popular station for visits in the City.

We will have juice packs and coffee available for visitors. We will also have cookies or snack bars (all ingredients will be listed and we will ensure there are no peanuts of common allergens).


We will have tours of fire apparatus and the station going on continuously. We also intend to set up apparatus such as aerials and pumps to demonstrate their operation if possible. A hose for kids to knock down pylons will be set up in the parking lot weather permitting.

The Calgary Fire Department was first formed in 1885 and is celebrating its 133 anniversary on August 25. The fire bylaw was the impetus for Calgary’s sandstone renaissance in the late 19th century. After the Calgary Fire of 1886, the bylaw demanded all new buildings be fire resistant, hence buildings of brick and sandstone from the era of 1886 to 1915.

The Department responds to over 60,000 calls annually and is the third largest in Canada. Chief Cappy Smart was a cultural and social leader who marshaled the first Stampede Parade and every parade for the first three decades of its existence.

The Department has grown in lockstep with the City and our stations in the respective communities were usually one of the first items of infrastructure in the neighborhoods.

Temple fire station is always one of the three busiest in the City and goes to more house fires and MVCs than any other station.

We will have juice packs and coffee available for visitors. We will also have cookies or snack bars (all ingredients will be listed and we will ensure there are no peanuts of common allergens).


We will have tours of fire apparatus and the station going on continuously. We also intend to set up apparatus such as aerials and pumps to demonstrate their operation if possible. A hose for kids to knock down pylons will be set up in the parking lot weather permitting.

The City of Calgary Archives has an offsite storage facility in the Corporate Warehouse. It is a separate large room built within the warehouse in order to provide an environmentally-controlled storage area for the Archives’ holdings.

The City of Calgary Archives maintains the corporate memory of The City of Calgary. The records are part of the archival holdings and have been created to document the structure, functions, activities, and history of The City of Calgary and its predecessors. Deemed to have historical value, they are being preserved in order for citizens and City employees to have research access to them now and in the future.

If you are interested in seeing the space where Corporate Records, Archives stores a large portion of its archival holdings, as well as artifacts received by The City of Calgary, then this is the tour for you!


Tour our environmentally-controlled storage area to view historical records and artifacts, and learn about some of the design features used to facilitate the long-term preservation and availability of records to future users.

Hear about the history of the municipal government of The City of Calgary and the role of the archives as the official repository of its permanently valuable records.

Tours will be provided at 10:00 am, 11:00 am, 1:00 pm, 2:00 pm and 3:00 pm.
Tours will take approximately 45 minutes, including questions.
A maximum of 10 – 15 participants per tour.

Please note that food and drinks are not allowed in the Archives’ storage area.