Explore your inner-geek and play with the latest in robotics, coding, maker activities, tinker time, and new technologies like 3D printing and wearable tech.

One guided tour per hour to tinker, code and have fun with tech!

Code your own Minecraft character; Build your own animal with Lego robotics; Make your clothes sparkle with wearable tech

Wonder what a Buddhist temple would be like? We have all types of people. The tradition is Japanese, Jodo Shinshu. We have dharma school for the kids, meditation services, and Sunday services we sit in chairs and listen to a dharma talk.

Come for service at 10 am or drop in between 11:30 and 4 pm on Sunday we will do a little mini instruction tour in groups as people arrive including the history of the building and what services are like.

In 1981 the building was purchased from the Croatian Church, the steeple was removed, and it became the home for the Calgary Buddhist Temple; renovated to its current modern look in 2015. Before that, the building itself was home to a number of Catholic Churches before being bought by the Buddhist community. Built in 1912, it was originally in Tuxedo Park at 23 Ave and 1 St, which was the outskirts of town, with the expectation that city would grow to it. But a year later the economy crashed and it was left way out of town.

The first group to worship in the church was St. Stephens Ukrainian congregation. St. Josephs Roman Catholic congregation used the space as well until their structure was built a couple years later. During the first world war, the church was shut down for a period due to the discriminatory attitudes that existed against the Ukrainian population.


In 1926, with immigration having resumed and many of the Ukrainian population concentrating in the Bridgeland/Riverside area, the church was moved. In 1958 the congregation built their current location up on the hill in Bridgeland and sold this building to another Roman Catholic congregation, Our Lady Queen of Poland. When that group became too big for the building they sold it to a Croatian Church who worshiped there until 1981 when the Buddhist community bought it. Most of this information came from this audio recording – CBC.

http://www.cbc.ca/eyeopener/episode/2011/08/11/hidden-calgary—a-century-old-church-in-bridgeland/

Fourth-generation Syrian refugees bring the centuries-old art of soap making to Calgary

Abdulfatah Sabouni is a fourth generation soap maker. Making soap has been his family business for more than 125 years. Even his last name, Sabouni, means soap maker.

In 2015, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s military issued warnings to the residents of Aleppo to vacate the city. Fearing for his family’s safety and weary of the sounds of bombs and gunfire, Sabouni and his loved ones left their home city and joined the more than seven million Syrians desperately trying to escape the madness. They first made their way to Jordan, and two years later they landed safely on Canadian soil, thanks to help from the federal government. Now the gregarious father is proudly showing off the showroom and factory for Aleppo Savon, his new business here in Canada.

The centuries-old tradition of Aleppo soap making — which uses no chemicals or other additives —involves secret family recipes handed down for generations. In the 11th century, the Crusaders brought Aleppo soap back to Europe, starting a centuries-long love affair with the coconut and olive-oil based soap said to be intensely moisturizing. Aleppo soap is thought to be one of the world’s oldest types of soap and also said to have been the inspiration for the equally famous Marseille soap of France.

As the Syrian war heated up, many life-long soap makers fled with their families. Traditional soap factories in Aleppo were either destroyed or abandoned, creating a worldwide shortage of Aleppo soap. Newspaper headlines appeared in Europe, Saudi Arabia, and Japan, where the soap is highly coveted.

When Sabouni arrived in Calgary two years ago, his entrepreneurial dreams were never far from his thoughts. He threw himself into learning English and co-founded with two friends: another Syrian refugee, Walid Balsha, and Syrian-Canadian entrepreneur Husny Hadry. Together the three got the ball rolling, and opened Aleppo Savon to great success. Their business continues to grow, and they have big plans for distribution across Canada and North America.

For Sabouni, making the world-famous Aleppo soap is his way of giving back to a city and country that has given him and his family so much.

Calgary Meals on Wheels has been a part of the fabric of the community since 1965. In that time we have served more than 8 million meals to individuals, school children, and community groups throughout the city!

Did You Know?
• Calgary Meals on Wheels is available to anyone in our community, regardless of age or income. When you have too much on your plate – let us do the cooking!
• We serve school children! At Calgary Meals on Wheels, we serve 31 Calgary schools!
• All our meals are prepared by our dedicated staff, including a Red Seal Chef and Registered Dietitian! Our team of 40 staff and 700 volunteers prepare and deliver our meals right here, in Calgary.
• In more than 50 years, we have never missed a day of scheduled delivery!

Visitors will take a tour of our 15,000 sq. ft. production facility, walk through our commercial kitchen and help spread joy to our clients by decorating cards at our greeting card station!  Decorate greeting cards for our clients. Find out how we produce 2,500 meals per day with just one chef! Yes, we offer guided tours

Four tours per hour (15 guests per tour).

For those interested, sample packs of our four most popular entrees will be available for $20 (cash only)

 

We have lots happening at our booth so you can see what goes on behind the scenes at The City of Calgary.

911 services will demonstrate what happens when we receive an emergency call, a certified professional dog trainer will give tips and tricks to pet owners, a livery officer will share information about how to stay safe when using taxis and ride-sharing vehicles and a bylaw officer will bring a vehicle and educate participants on the various bylaws in Calgary, including Parks and responsible pet ownership.

Stop by and talk to us, we’d love to see you!

YouthLink is home to the Calgary Police Museum, a site filled with Calgary Police stories, exhibits, and artifacts dating back to the late 1880s.

We believe that if youth are educated with the facts and armed with the relevant information, they have a better chance of making good decisions in the face of peer pressure and other factors. We also know that one bad decision can lead them down a path to either being a victim of crime or a perpetrator of crime. Our goal is that the information they learn while visiting and learning in our immersive exhibits will keep them safe for life.

We will be featuring ‘behind the scenes’ talks and activities relating to the police museum and the Calgary Police Service. A display of never-seen-before artifacts, ‘Tales from the Crypt’ – creepy stories from our archives.

All areas of the museum will showcase a variety of units of the Calgary Police Service – there will be uniformed officers on-site giving presentations and facilitating unique activities and games.

The total building capacity is 300. Each classroom can hold about 60 people.

Built in 1987 by Graham McCourt Architects, the Olympic Oval Long Track Skating facility was constructed for the 1988 Calgary Olympic Winter Games.  It is one of the legacy facilities from the 1988 Olympic Winter Games and a possible location for the 2026 Calgary Olympic Winer Games.

The Olympic Oval is able to provide a self-guided tour of the building. The 3rd Floor Observation deck provides a stunning 180-degree view of all 150,000 square feet. It’s a spectacular view.

KidSIM is a world-class program known for delivering education to healthcare teams, family members and students in a simulation environment.  It is the largest pediatric simulation training centre in Canada.

Doors Open YYC gives visitors a rare opportunity to get an exclusive look at the KidSIM Simulation Centre at the Alberta Children’s Hospital! Centre staff will be on hand offering behind-the-scenes tours and broadcasting simulations showcasing the use of high-fidelity mannequins and state-of-the-art technology.

Visitors will also have the opportunity to have hands-on experience with the mannequins and observe some of the equipment that is similarly used in clinical settings throughout the Alberta Children’s Hospital. With beautiful architectural details and state-of-the-art technology, this amazing centre solidifies the KidSIM Program as one of the premiere simulation facilities in the world!

 

Choklat was the first craft chocolate maker in Western Canada, and in the past 10 years has grown to be known as one of the finest craft chocolate companies in the world.

Just like Willy Wonka’s factory, join us on a behind the scenes tour of a real chocolate factory, where you’ll see equipment that actually makes chocolate, and you’ll taste chocolate made from some of the rarest cocoa beans in the world. You’ll never look at chocolate the same way again!

Learn how chocolate is made. Sample a real drinking chocolate! Get a close-up of real cocoa beans!

The maximum number of guests per tour is 20 people. Tours every hour on the hour.

Offering a mix of the best rock, news-talk, adult contemporary and country, Corus Radio is home to 39 stations situated in eight of Canada’s top 10 markets, reaching more than seven million Canadians each week and streaming 6.2 million hours of content per month. Featuring some of Canada’s greatest talent and the industry’s best brands — Country 105, Q107 and Global News Radio 770 CHQR — Corus Radio is committed to engaging and connecting with our listeners and communities across the country.

Tours of on-air studios, news studios, production studios, photo ops.

Unfortunately the tours are full!  Please check out some of our other Sites!

Avatamsaka Monastery is one of 27 branch monasteries of the Dharma Realm Buddhist
Association, established by Venerable Master Hsuan Hua. “Avatamsaka” is a Sanskrit word
meaning ‘flower garland’ and monastery in Sanskrit is “Bodhimanda,” a place for awakening.
Avatamsaka is also the name of one of the most significant Buddhist sutras.

This is our sacred space and we hope that all who enter will find the sacred within them. We
encourage people to open and expand their wisdom and compassion. Everyone, who has
an interest in self-exploration is welcome in our monastery.

We have an eclectic congregation of people from different backgrounds and countries and
accommodate the variety of languages they speak. The monastery offers numerous
activities during the year, including interfaith dialogues, veggie buffets, a banquet in
appreciation of seniors, and pilgrimages to Castle Mountain.

As you tour the Temple, you will see Dharma Masters, identifiable by their robes and
volunteers, identifiable by their vests. Please ask them any questions you have regarding
the various exhibits and traditional Buddhist art displayed throughout the monastery.

This building, originally called the Bow Building was designed by Dr. Cam Sproule and
completed in 1959. The rough-cut stones are native to Alberta. Since moving into this
building in 1996 we have undertaken two major renovations in 2005 and 2017 adding four
stories to the original building. The exterior is finished with the same rough-cut stones while
the interior now includes a meditation hall, a prayer hall, a dining area and ancillary rooms
for meetings and activities.

The prayer hall, completed in 2017, is called the Great Jewelled Hall. It is 62 feet in height
and houses the three bronze statues; the central statue of Vairochana Buddha including his
halo is 18 feet tall. The walls of the hall are lined with 10,000 statues which are all
handcrafted and made by volunteers in the basement of the monastery. You can view the
entire statue-making process in the video corner. At the west side of the Great Jewelled Hall
is a rare set of books of the Buddhist Canon.

In his address at the inauguration of the Great Jewelled Hall, Mayor Nenshi said, “This place
should be a centre of faith, a centre of community for many, many generations. . . . bringing
faith into the heart of our city . . . [and it] reminds us that our roles are to build a better
community for everyone.” We strive every day to build a better community and a better
world for all.

We pray that the Buddha’s light will shine throughout the city, the province, the country and
the entire world, bringing peace and compassion to all.

Pre-registration for guided tours, maximum 50 people. (11am and 2pm)

Opened in 2017 in the Riddell Library and Learning Centre, the Mount Royal University Library boasts stunning LEED Gold certified architecture as well as innovative teaching, learning, and creative spaces. The doors will be open for you to visit the Maker Studio, explore VR/AR/MR in the Experience Lab, and get inspired in the Visualization spaces. Don’t leave without taking a self-guided tour through the building, including current exhibits, displays, and a visit to Barrow—a student-owned and operated café on the first floor.  

Calgary community members can also learn how to access our collections and spaces, as well as attend Library-hosted events throughout the year from Service Desk staff who will be available to answer questions.

There are restrictions on the number of people who can be in some of the specialized spaces at a time (20-25 for Maker Studio, 6-10 for the Experience Lab (Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, and Mixed Reality), 60 for Ideas (Visualization Lounge).

The cornerstone for the present location of the church was laid in September 1955, by Most Rev. Neil Savaryn OSBM, Bishop of the Ukrainian Catholic Eparchy of Edmonton. By December of that year, Divine Liturgies were being held in the completed basement of the church which then doubled as a church sanctuary and hall until the main storey could be completed. From its origins at the start of the 20th century, the parish was under the patronage of St. Stephen the Protomartyr. During the relocation to the present location the name of the parish changed. Because of the devotion that an Auschwitz survivor, the then-current pastor Fr. George Kowalsky had to the Virgin Mary, and in fulfillment of a vow he had made to Her and in gratitude, for being freed from the Nazi concentration camp he convinced the parishioners to place the church under the protection of the Mother of God. The name change was formalized in 1957.

 

CJSW 90.9FM is Calgary’s campus and community radio station, located at the University of Calgary. CJSW is a non-profit society maintained and operated by a group of seven staff members and over 300 volunteers drawn from both the University of Calgary student body and the wider city of Calgary population. CJSW broadcasts music, spoken word and multicultural programming on 90.9FM and streaming right here at cjsw.com!

Come to visit us for a tour of the station, and spin some tracks on our DJ mixers & turntables, and experiment with different vocal effects in our recording booths!

Radio Station Tours! DJ Workshops! Voice Recording Workshops! 15 people per tour, 1 tour per hour

Fourth-generation Syrian refugees bring the centuries-old art of soap making to Calgary

Abdulfatah Sabouni is a fourth generation soap maker. Making soap has been his family business for more than 125 years. Even his last name, Sabouni, means soap maker.

In 2015, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s military issued warnings to the residents of Aleppo to vacate the city. Fearing for his family’s safety and weary of the sounds of bombs and gunfire, Sabouni and his loved ones left their home city and joined the more than seven million Syrians desperately trying to escape the madness. They first made their way to Jordan, and two years later they landed safely on Canadian soil, thanks to help from the federal government. Now the gregarious father is proudly showing off the showroom and factory for Aleppo Savon, his new business here in Canada.

The centuries-old tradition of Aleppo soap making — which uses no chemicals or other additives —involves secret family recipes handed down for generations. In the 11th century, the Crusaders brought Aleppo soap back to Europe, starting a centuries-long love affair with the coconut and olive-oil based soap said to be intensely moisturizing. Aleppo soap is thought to be one of the world’s oldest types of soap and also said to have been the inspiration for the equally famous Marseille soap of France.

As the Syrian war heated up, many life-long soap makers fled with their families. Traditional soap factories in Aleppo were either destroyed or abandoned, creating a worldwide shortage of Aleppo soap. Newspaper headlines appeared in Europe, Saudi Arabia, and Japan, where the soap is highly coveted.

When Sabouni arrived in Calgary two years ago, his entrepreneurial dreams were never far from his thoughts. He threw himself into learning English and co-founded with two friends: another Syrian refugee, Walid Balsha, and Syrian-Canadian entrepreneur Husny Hadry. Together the three got the ball rolling, and opened Aleppo Savon to great success. Their business continues to grow, and they have big plans for distribution across Canada and North America.

For Sabouni, making the world-famous Aleppo soap is his way of giving back to a city and country that has given him and his family so much.

Global Calgary (also known as CICT) signed on October 8th, 1954 as CHCT, the first television station in Alberta. The studios, offices, and antenna were located seven miles west of the city of Calgary.

Almost twenty years later, CHCT was purchased by Selkirk Broadcasting, and the station’s call sign was changed to CFAC-TV. In 1979, the station branded itself as Channel 2&7, referring to its cable location.

In 1989, CFAC-TV was once again sold, this time to Western International Communications (WIC). In March 1990, the call letters were changed to CKKX-TV. Two years later, the station’s news operations expanded with the purchase of a satellite uplink truck and a fleet of electronic news gathering microwave trucks.

On September 7th, 1993, CKKX was renamed CICT-TV, the call letters used today. It also took on the brand of Calgary 7.

The station was sold to Canwest in 1998 but required approval from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC). Approval was given in 2000. On September 4th of that year, CICT-TV joined the Global Television Network, along with fellow Alberta stations, CITV-TV (Edmonton), and CISA (Lethbridge). By 2001, Global Calgary also began airing in Drumheller and Banff.

On April 11th, 2007, CICT became the first station in Calgary with a news helicopter. Named Global 1, it provides traffic reports during Global News Morning and Global News at 5 & 6, as well as breaking news coverage you can’t find anywhere else.

Now, Global Calgary is part of the expansive team with Corus Entertainment, that offers Canadians from coast to coast a host of news and information – from breaking news in their community to deep engaging content that puts complex world issues in perspective. Our local newsrooms provide up-to-the-minute community-based news, weather, and information, while our national coverage features stories, analysis and deep, engaging content about issues in Canada and abroad.

Visitors will receive a guided tour of Calgary’s #1 News Station, meet & greets with Global News anchors and reporters and see the magic behind television news.

Tours are now full.

Chinook Resource Management Group is responsible for the design, build and operation of the facility. It is a partnership between Maple Reinders, Bird construction and AIM environmental.

The facility was built in 2017 on the former site of Race City Speedway.

LEED gold certification pending.  Energy-saving measures include solar array and rainwater collection.

It is the largest facility of its kind in Canada.

The facility was purpose-built for Calgary’s green cart program that was introduced in 2017. It diverts approximately 85 million kilograms of food and yard waste from the landfill each year, producing nutrient-rich compost for use in gardens, farms and City parks.

Did you ever wonder what happens to your food scraps and yard waste once it’s collected from the green cart? Join us for a 30-minute virtual tour of The City’s new composting facility and learn how we produce nutrient-rich compost in approximately 60 days.

We’re serious about recycling and composting and have set ambitious goals to reduce waste going to our landfills. Our vision is to lead the community towards zero waste through innovative recycling, composting and diversion programs.

Presentations will run in the composting facility classroom throughout the day every 30 minutes. Staff will be available to answer all your waste and recycling questions!

Please note: this is a Virtual Tour, not a behind-the-scenes tour.

 

Situated on the corner of 9th Ave and 4th St SE in the East Village, the sleek ENMAX District Energy Centre is a facility you’ve likely walked, cycled, or driven by many times and may have mistaken as an office building. Take a closer look through its street-level windows, and instead of desks and cubicles, you’ll see a network of pipes. This infrastructure is the heart of a thermal network that consists of over 5,500 metres of underground insulated pipes that bring centralized heating to commercial, institutional and residential buildings across downtown. Opened in 2010, the 20,000 sq. ft. facility houses 55 MW of high-efficiency natural gas boilers that can heat over 10 million sq. ft. of space in the downtown core and East Village. In other words, enough office space for nearly 100,000 people.

The underground network of pipes carries thermal energy, in the form of hot water, to be used for space heating and domestic hot water to customers including City Hall, Studio Bell, Simmons Building, Hilton Hotel, Telus SKY, and Intact Place. Although District Energy as a concept isn’t new, what sets this system apart is the additional ways it delivers efficiency. In early 2018, ENMAX added a 3.3 MW combined heat and power (CHP) unit to the District Energy Centre which enables on-site electricity generation and increases the plant’s reliability, resiliency, and efficiency. The building also has rooftop solar and battery storage used to generate and discharge electricity in unique ways. Come to visit us on September 22 as part of Doors Open YYC 2018 to learn more.

District Energy allows for an entire district or community to be heated from one central location, resulting in greater efficiency and fewer emissions than conventional heating systems.

As technology advances, new fuel sources will continue to be integrated into the District Energy Centre, benefitting all buildings connected to the system at the same time.

The ENMAX District Energy Centre will be open for guided tours as part of Doors Open YYC on September 22 from 10:00 am – 3:00 pm.
The ENMAX District Energy Centre is an operating industrial facility. A waiver of liability is required to participate in the facility tour.
• Guided tours are on a first-come-first-serve basis.
• Tours duration is 15-20 minutes in length.
• Tour sizes are restricted to 15 people at a time.
• All tour guests must wear flat close-toed shoes. No exceptions.
• Hard hats and safety glasses will be provided to all tour guests.