The parish replaced the frame church with a more elaborate structure in 1905, during Calgary’s famous sandstone era. It is of local, rough cut Paskapoo sandstone, and has one of the oldest tin roofs in Calgary. It was designed by J.C.M. Keith of Victoria, BC. The Cathedral celebrated the 100th anniversary of the first service held in the building on July 30, 2005. It was designated a Registered Heritage Site in 1974.  In 1936, the Lady Chapel, the gift of Henry and Eleanor Tomkins was constructed. In its tower hangs a bell, which had originally hung in the tower of the first wooden church on the site. The bell was donated as a remembrance to Corporal Lowry of the North West Mounted Police who died during the Riel Rebellion of 1885. The rood screen was dedicated in 1919 by Prince of Wales. Some historic stained glass windows dating back to 1891. Historic war memorials can be found in the Cathedral. Hand-carved Oak Pulpit and bronze lectern are original to the 1905 construction.  The Cathedral is an important music venue with one of Calgary’s fine organs and home to Pro-Arts which features a free noon-hour concert each Wednesday.

Please note there is a regular Sunday Service at 10:30 AM, otherwise, activities start at noon on September 23.

Fourth-generation Syrian refugees bring the centuries-old art of soap making to Calgary

Abdulfatah Sabouni is a fourth generation soap maker. Making soap has been his family business for more than 125 years. Even his last name, Sabouni, means soap maker.

In 2015, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s military issued warnings to the residents of Aleppo to vacate the city. Fearing for his family’s safety and weary of the sounds of bombs and gunfire, Sabouni and his loved ones left their home city and joined the more than seven million Syrians desperately trying to escape the madness. They first made their way to Jordan, and two years later they landed safely on Canadian soil, thanks to help from the federal government. Now the gregarious father is proudly showing off the showroom and factory for Aleppo Savon, his new business here in Canada.

The centuries-old tradition of Aleppo soap making — which uses no chemicals or other additives —involves secret family recipes handed down for generations. In the 11th century, the Crusaders brought Aleppo soap back to Europe, starting a centuries-long love affair with the coconut and olive-oil based soap said to be intensely moisturizing. Aleppo soap is thought to be one of the world’s oldest types of soap and also said to have been the inspiration for the equally famous Marseille soap of France.

As the Syrian war heated up, many life-long soap makers fled with their families. Traditional soap factories in Aleppo were either destroyed or abandoned, creating a worldwide shortage of Aleppo soap. Newspaper headlines appeared in Europe, Saudi Arabia, and Japan, where the soap is highly coveted.

When Sabouni arrived in Calgary two years ago, his entrepreneurial dreams were never far from his thoughts. He threw himself into learning English and co-founded with two friends: another Syrian refugee, Walid Balsha, and Syrian-Canadian entrepreneur Husny Hadry. Together the three got the ball rolling, and opened Aleppo Savon to great success. Their business continues to grow, and they have big plans for distribution across Canada and North America.

For Sabouni, making the world-famous Aleppo soap is his way of giving back to a city and country that has given him and his family so much.

Wonder what a Buddhist temple would be like? We have all types of people. The tradition is Japanese, Jodo Shinshu. We have dharma school for the kids, meditation services, and Sunday services we sit in chairs and listen to a dharma talk.

Come for service at 10 am or drop in between 11:30 and 4 pm on Sunday we will do a little mini instruction tour in groups as people arrive including the history of the building and what services are like.

In 1981 the building was purchased from the Croatian Church, the steeple was removed, and it became the home for the Calgary Buddhist Temple; renovated to its current modern look in 2015. Before that, the building itself was home to a number of Catholic Churches before being bought by the Buddhist community. Built in 1912, it was originally in Tuxedo Park at 23 Ave and 1 St, which was the outskirts of town, with the expectation that city would grow to it. But a year later the economy crashed and it was left way out of town.

The first group to worship in the church was St. Stephens Ukrainian congregation. St. Josephs Roman Catholic congregation used the space as well until their structure was built a couple years later. During the first world war, the church was shut down for a period due to the discriminatory attitudes that existed against the Ukrainian population.


In 1926, with immigration having resumed and many of the Ukrainian population concentrating in the Bridgeland/Riverside area, the church was moved. In 1958 the congregation built their current location up on the hill in Bridgeland and sold this building to another Roman Catholic congregation, Our Lady Queen of Poland. When that group became too big for the building they sold it to a Croatian Church who worshiped there until 1981 when the Buddhist community bought it. Most of this information came from this audio recording – CBC.

http://www.cbc.ca/eyeopener/episode/2011/08/11/hidden-calgary—a-century-old-church-in-bridgeland/

Avatamsaka Monastery is one of 27 branch monasteries of the Dharma Realm Buddhist
Association, established by Venerable Master Hsuan Hua. “Avatamsaka” is a Sanskrit word
meaning ‘flower garland’ and monastery in Sanskrit is “Bodhimanda,” a place for awakening.
Avatamsaka is also the name of one of the most significant Buddhist sutras.

This is our sacred space and we hope that all who enter will find the sacred within them. We
encourage people to open and expand their wisdom and compassion. Everyone, who has
an interest in self-exploration is welcome in our monastery.

We have an eclectic congregation of people from different backgrounds and countries and
accommodate the variety of languages they speak. The monastery offers numerous
activities during the year, including interfaith dialogues, veggie buffets, a banquet in
appreciation of seniors, and pilgrimages to Castle Mountain.

As you tour the Temple, you will see Dharma Masters, identifiable by their robes and
volunteers, identifiable by their vests. Please ask them any questions you have regarding
the various exhibits and traditional Buddhist art displayed throughout the monastery.

This building, originally called the Bow Building was designed by Dr. Cam Sproule and
completed in 1959. The rough-cut stones are native to Alberta. Since moving into this
building in 1996 we have undertaken two major renovations in 2005 and 2017 adding four
stories to the original building. The exterior is finished with the same rough-cut stones while
the interior now includes a meditation hall, a prayer hall, a dining area and ancillary rooms
for meetings and activities.

The prayer hall, completed in 2017, is called the Great Jewelled Hall. It is 62 feet in height
and houses the three bronze statues; the central statue of Vairochana Buddha including his
halo is 18 feet tall. The walls of the hall are lined with 10,000 statues which are all
handcrafted and made by volunteers in the basement of the monastery. You can view the
entire statue-making process in the video corner. At the west side of the Great Jewelled Hall
is a rare set of books of the Buddhist Canon.

In his address at the inauguration of the Great Jewelled Hall, Mayor Nenshi said, “This place
should be a centre of faith, a centre of community for many, many generations. . . . bringing
faith into the heart of our city . . . [and it] reminds us that our roles are to build a better
community for everyone.” We strive every day to build a better community and a better
world for all.

We pray that the Buddha’s light will shine throughout the city, the province, the country and
the entire world, bringing peace and compassion to all.

Pre-registration for guided tours, maximum 50 people. (11am and 2pm)

The parish replaced the frame church with a more elaborate structure in 1905, during Calgary’s famous sandstone era. It is of local, rough cut Paskapoo sandstone, and has one of the oldest tin roofs in Calgary. It was designed by J.C.M. Keith of Victoria, BC. The Cathedral celebrated the 100th anniversary of the first service held in the building on July 30, 2005. It was designated a Registered Heritage Site in 1974.  In 1936, the Lady Chapel, the gift of Henry and Eleanor Tomkins was constructed. In its tower hangs a bell, which had originally hung in the tower of the first wooden church on the site. The bell was donated as a remembrance to Corporal Lowry of the North West Mounted Police who died during the Riel Rebellion of 1885. The rood screen was dedicated in 1919 by Prince of Wales. Some historic stained glass windows dating back to 1891. Historic war memorials can be found in the Cathedral. Hand-carved Oak Pulpit and bronze lectern are original to the 1905 construction.  The Cathedral is an important music venue with one of Calgary’s fine organs and home to Pro-Arts which features a free noon-hour concert each Wednesday.

Beautiful Islamic Architecture of Baitunnur Mosque, One of the largest Mosques in North America. Inaugurated by Worldwide Supreme Head of Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama’at and joined by Prime Minister of Canada.

Guided Mosque Tours, Free refreshments, Q & A opportunities for the visitors etc.

The cornerstone for the present location of the church was laid in September 1955, by Most Rev. Neil Savaryn OSBM, Bishop of the Ukrainian Catholic Eparchy of Edmonton. By December of that year, Divine Liturgies were being held in the completed basement of the church which then doubled as a church sanctuary and hall until the main storey could be completed. From its origins at the start of the 20th century, the parish was under the patronage of St. Stephen the Protomartyr. During the relocation to the present location the name of the parish changed. Because of the devotion that an Auschwitz survivor, the then-current pastor Fr. George Kowalsky had to the Virgin Mary, and in fulfillment of a vow he had made to Her and in gratitude, for being freed from the Nazi concentration camp he convinced the parishioners to place the church under the protection of the Mother of God. The name change was formalized in 1957.

 

Fourth-generation Syrian refugees bring the centuries-old art of soap making to Calgary

Abdulfatah Sabouni is a fourth generation soap maker. Making soap has been his family business for more than 125 years. Even his last name, Sabouni, means soap maker.

In 2015, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s military issued warnings to the residents of Aleppo to vacate the city. Fearing for his family’s safety and weary of the sounds of bombs and gunfire, Sabouni and his loved ones left their home city and joined the more than seven million Syrians desperately trying to escape the madness. They first made their way to Jordan, and two years later they landed safely on Canadian soil, thanks to help from the federal government. Now the gregarious father is proudly showing off the showroom and factory for Aleppo Savon, his new business here in Canada.

The centuries-old tradition of Aleppo soap making — which uses no chemicals or other additives —involves secret family recipes handed down for generations. In the 11th century, the Crusaders brought Aleppo soap back to Europe, starting a centuries-long love affair with the coconut and olive-oil based soap said to be intensely moisturizing. Aleppo soap is thought to be one of the world’s oldest types of soap and also said to have been the inspiration for the equally famous Marseille soap of France.

As the Syrian war heated up, many life-long soap makers fled with their families. Traditional soap factories in Aleppo were either destroyed or abandoned, creating a worldwide shortage of Aleppo soap. Newspaper headlines appeared in Europe, Saudi Arabia, and Japan, where the soap is highly coveted.

When Sabouni arrived in Calgary two years ago, his entrepreneurial dreams were never far from his thoughts. He threw himself into learning English and co-founded with two friends: another Syrian refugee, Walid Balsha, and Syrian-Canadian entrepreneur Husny Hadry. Together the three got the ball rolling, and opened Aleppo Savon to great success. Their business continues to grow, and they have big plans for distribution across Canada and North America.

For Sabouni, making the world-famous Aleppo soap is his way of giving back to a city and country that has given him and his family so much.

The only functional year-round ski jumping facility in Canada that includes jumps from 10 meter to 90 meter.

Annual users this year on our newly built smallest 3 m mobile jump exceeded 5000 children. Some of them join our year-round multi-sport program, with a dream to go to the Olympics in 2 ski disciplines – Ski Jumping and Nordic Combined skiing.

Tour of the ski jumps and introduction to ski jumping on mini 3 m jump. Hats signed by Eddie the Eagle for sale – donation based.

20 people per tour